Wednesday, May 2, 2018

How to Teach Children(6 years)

As kids make the transition from toddlerhood to childhood, they grow at a remarkable rate. Their cognitive and language skills develop dramatically during these years, as they transition from simple "why?" questions to enjoying jokes, riddles, and telling stories that follow a sequential order. During these years, children also have rich imaginations, strong fears, and love to play, so it's important to employ educational strategies that are both adapted to their current developmental stage while also challenging them to grow. Whatever your role in a child's life (teacher, parent, or another caregiver), you can make learning productive and enjoyable for both of you. 

Talking with Children

Ask open-ended questions. Because children are developing foundational language skills during this time period, it's important to engage them in communication as much as possible. Asking questions is a great way to converse with your child while encouraging them to think about the world around them. But make sure to use "open" questions that lend themselves to more conversation.
  • Examples of open questions are: "Why do you think that happened?" or "What do you think is going on?"
  • You can also make "open" statements that will stimulate discussion: "Tell me more about your idea!"
  • You can find great resources online that give lists of other sample open questions.
  • Closed questions typically lend themselves to one word answers. Asking, "are you happy or sad," can be answered with a single word. Yes/no questions also fall into this category.
  • Closed questions can be informative, but you want to ensure that you are also asking open questions that will get children talking.




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Listen to children and answer their questions. Children will naturally come up with questions while learning something new. Take time to listen to their questions and encourage them to think of an answer to their own questions. This can stimulate their cognitive development by wondering aloud with you. Once you've supported your child to think of an answer to her own question, you can also try to formulate the best answer you can think of that directly answers their question."
  • Sometimes you might have to ask if you understand their question correctly. You can find out by rephrasing it and saying, "Is that what you're asking?" After you answer, you can ask, "Did that answer your question?"
  • If your child asks questions at times that aren't good for you, be sure to explain to tell them why it's not a good time. Be sure to say, "I really want to hear about that (or talk about that), but right now isn't a good time. Can we talk during dinner (or at another specified time)?[1]
  • Be aware that children with communication disorders or delays may not respond well to open-ended questions. Being able to state "yes", "no" or say "juice" or "milk" may be the level the child is at in such a case.



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Read aloud to your children. Reading to children is the single most important activity for language development and for laying the groundwork for later literacy. It builds sound-symbol awareness, which is an important factor that influences a child's later ability to learn to read. It also builds motivation, curiosity, memory, and of course, vocabulary. When children have positive experiences with books at a very early age, they are much more likely to enjoy books, see themselves as readers, and have a strong foundation in literacy.
  • Find books with pictures for the younger ages (3-6) and allow children to stop and ask questions or talk about the book during your reading times.
  • Seek out a diverse array of books that both reflect your child's own life, experiences, and culture and expose them to different ones as well. There are numerous excellent book lists online.[2]
  • Keep a variety of age- and interest- appropriate books around the house or the classroom to foster children's independent reading. Ask children what they like to read and make those types of books available.
  • Continue reading aloud to older children. They never really become too old for it! Before bedtime each night or at the end of the school day are great times for this activity.
during this time period, it's important to engage them in communication as much 
4. Speak in a kind and respectful manner. It's important to talk to children in the way you would like children to talk. Kids learn best by imitating. If you want your children to be polite, practice good manners and pay attention to the tone of your voice.

  • Be sure to say "please", "thank you", "excuse me", "I am sorry" when interacting with your children or when talking to other adults in front of them.
as possible. Asking questions is a great way to converse with your child while encouraging them to think about the world around them. But make sure to use "open" questions that lend 


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